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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 60 (some duplicates have been removed)
to space to stem-cell research to name a few. can science stay objective out of politics? alex is co-author of science left behind, feel good fallacies in the rise of the anti-scientific left. welcome. >> thank you for having me on. >> sure. you argue here that for all of the talk about republicans being the enemy of science, anti-scientific rhetoric is a by partisan project. tell me how you came to this opinion that democrats are not necessarily the party of science. >> well, on a whole host of issues, so as you know, on the right the conservatives are wrong on evolution and on climate change, and there's this it media narrative that somehow anti-science believes are unique to the right side of the political spectrum. what i found through reading a lot of science is basically that the left side also has some pet ideas not lining up with the scientific mainstream. for instance, opposition to genetic modification. the california democratic party endorsed this proportion to label food in direct opposition to the american medical association. the anti-vaccine movement started on the lef
with the gets? >> doing s.t.e.avenue. m. >> science, technology, engineering, art and math. >> hey, do you do "gangnam style." >> what does that mean? >> gangnam sfooil? >> psy. the horse dance. >> the horse dance. >> you got it. >> like that. >> there we go. >> oh, yeah. oh, yeah. ♪ >> almost as good as david gregory. >> you name, it elmo can do it. >> there we go. >> that was fantastic. >> let's talk about -- did you read the "new york times." >> yeah, "new york times." there's an article that the word really is overused. >> really? >> really. >> really. >> a whole article devoted to, that really? >> really. >> it used to be kind of like that's surprising, but now it's that snarky really? >> really. >> really. >> it has been overused. by the writers and shows to make that kind of funny turn. it has been a little overused. what are some other -- i'm actually thinking of like, you know, like. >> like, and, you know, i'm a complete offender. >> seriously. >> serious ly. >> really? >> what words are overused? >> elmo loves overusing love. >> oh. >> you can't overuse that word. >> you can't ov
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> welcome back to "early start." an american astronaut about to hitch a ride with the russians up to the international space station. later this month, nasa's kevin ford will join two russian astronauts aboard a russian soyuz spacecraft that will blast them into orbit for a five-month stay. ford will join the station's current team and take over as expedition commander. this will mark for the second space flight and his first aboard a russian soyuz spacecraft. kevin ford is joining us live now from the cosmonaut training center in star city, russia, where he and his crewmates have been preparing for the mission. thank you for being with us. you will be at that time iss from the end of the month until march of next year. can you tell us what you will be doing while you are there? >> well, i can't tell you exactly what we will be doing but i can tell you what we plan to do. so we -- we hope to carry out a lot of science. we had a lot of trainin
, first of all, the kind of science that you do for a living. you basically find out what we as people can handle when it comes to drama and exposure to these kind of horrifying, you know, events. there were crash test dummies in a lot of these seats. they were very expensive, weren't they? >> there are, about $150,000 uninstrumented. the data acquisition system needed to collect the data, all of that. we had probably at least, probably about 500,000 plus worth of instrumentation on that plane. >> you wanted to know every single ounce of data. every single knee that would get skinned on an airplane. >> exactly. because this isn't something we do every day. >> '84 was the last time you did it. >> we wanted to collect as much information as possible. and that was what was great about discovery. they allowed us to do that. they viewed this as a science experiment. >> now everybody wants to know where should i sit on an airplane? we've all heard the lore you'll die if you're in first class, you're better to be in the middle, no, the tail, then you see all of these different kind of crashes. >>
their heads thinking there is no way this could possibly work. the practices have no basis in science or medicine and they will now be relegated to the dust bin of quackery, your governor, david, is calling what you do quackery. can you just react to that and tell me how this new law will affect what you do? >> yes. let me tell you what kind of governor we have now. so, for instance, if a child is -- let me tell you first, any good competent therapist knows that homosexual feelings can result when one -- i'm talking about boys now, when one is raped or sexually molested. later in life, those feelings come up. what our governor decided now he knows best that the kind of profound affective therapy is quackery, that handles this kind of situation. >> david, how about the american psychiatric -- forgive me, i'll add on to the governor, the american psychiatric association says the potential risk of reparative therapy is great including depression, anxiety, self-destructive behavior, reparative therapy, this is the truth wins out, reparative therapy is junk science winning out by religious
media spin with science and public safety. as for the lame names, considering the weather channel is partially owned by nbc maybe they should look within t
been a strong category. and it continues to be. the sciences are strong. >> any negative implications from these numbers? >> the negative would be the part-time work. it's going to come back to this part-time work number. if you're working part time and that job for example, goes away or alternatively you're getting paid less than what you really need to survive, then obviously people are going to not be able to spend and be part of the economy like we want them. but another big part of the numbers is the 3.5 million job openings that do exist in this country. every time i speak to business leaders, they tell me one of the biggest issues facing the economy going forward is the skills gap that we see. there aren't enough people studying science engineering in this country to fill those jobs. >> stay with us rebecca. >>> we want to go now to nancy cordes at the white house with a question of how this is playing on the campaign trail. nancy, good morning. >> good morning to you charlie. the obama campaign and aides here at the white house will be thrilled by this numb
, weekend, home, science which were controversial but magnets for advertising. he created a national edition, bought up other newspapers and magazines and television stations. by the time he stepped down in 1997, the company was bringing in more than $2.5 billion in revenue. he was tough when he needed to be, facing down the nixon administration by publishing the secret penalty gone papers on the vietnam war and faced criticism from his own profession after giving an op-ed to welcome sapphire who went onto win a pulitzer. his son now runs the paper and company. he was 86. media monitor is next. >>> time for the media monitor. a look at the hits and errors in the news business. >>> roger simon got attention for his political column this week because he had paul ryan reportedly using a toxic nickname for his running mate, let ryan be ryan and let the stench be the stench. suddenly you could smell that story in lots of places. >> yes. the stench. that is what paul ryan is actually calling mitt romney according to politico. >> "the new york times" columnist blogged this is bad behavior, you're s
careful with our science that we don't convict, right, people who are ultimately innocent or in the reverse, that we don't ultimately exonerate people who are indeed guilty. >> if you want to learn more go to cnn.com/justice. we have a lot of great news for you there. i'm barack obama and i approve this message. romney: "it's time to stand up to the cheaters" vo: tough on china? not mitt romney. when a flood of chinese tires threatened a thousand american jobs... it was president obama who stood up to china and protected american workers. mitt romney attacked obama's decision... said standing up to china was "bad for the nation and our workers." how can mitt romney take on the cheaters... when he's taking their side? boring. boring. [ jack ] after lauren broke up with me, i went to the citi private pass page and decided to be...not boring. that's how i met marilyn... giada... really good. yes! [ jack ] ...and alicia. ♪ this girl is on fire [ male announcer ] use any citi card to get the benefits of private pass. more concerts, more events, more experiences. [ jack ] hey,
was once science-fiction but a multi-user space port with horizontal launch and landing capabilities as well as the facilities that we have available from shuttle along with this outstanding work force that's available down here to help make that transition. >> now, the dragon capsule is carrying about 1,000 pounds of cargo, everything from food to scientific experiments. if for some reason, fredricka, they can't get off the ground foen tonight, if the weather interrupts them, they will try again tomorrow, which is tomorrow, columbus day. which is kind of fitting, exploration on columbus day. >> i see the title. sounds good. thanks so much. >>> it sounds impossible, but a seasoned skydiver is out to set a world record when he jumps out of a balloon 23 miles up. both presidential campaigns are aimed at undecided voters. we'll size up that important group. online outfit piccolo headphones buy now broadway show megapixels place to sleep little roadster war and peace deep sea diving ninja app hipster glasses 5% cash back sign up to get 5% everywhere online through december. only from dis
science. you don't want to pick winners and losers in the companies that are going to survive. national science foundation obviously. >> good loan guarantees can be targeted. there are many ways to do things. one of the things that arianna has been discussing and i've found very compelling is this notion that we should provide opportunities and channels for national service in a variety of industries. this is something industry could do. i've been very involved with teach for america but you could have not only a teacher's corps, you could have medical corps, you could have financial services corps of young people coming out of college, having trouble finding a job but with industry associations, companies saying we're going to create interns and a service program where people can work for a year, maybe two years, learning a trade, learning a profession, whether they're trying to do legal services for america or financial services for america, or health or for that matter engineering, encoding, i think there are many ways for the private sector to work together with government to say he
and science teachers. we need that to moveorward as a country. >> that's a goal though, right? >> educating, training two million new workers in our community colleges in conjunction with business to fill jobs that are open right now. boosting american manufacturing by ending the tax break that sends jobs overseas and giving tax incentives to companies that start manufacturing businesses here. these are specific tangible proposals and, candy, i believe that they will pass because i believe the american people are supportive of that. >> but they haven't passed. >> a jury will render verdict november 6th. >> no, they haven't. >> for two years jobs -- >> some of the specific proposals haven't, but, candy, think about the logical extension of what you're saying. what you're saying is so we select the other guy because he will implement the proposals of the republican congress has pushed to cut taxes by $5 trillion skewed to the wealthy, can't pay for it. that will add burdens to the middle class to slash education, to slash research and development. >> i'm not suggesting -- >> he could get thos
to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> okay. five minutes before the close. look at this chart. a thing of beauty. we have jackie deangelis on more of this rally for kft. >> that's right. take a look at the stock. it's having a pretty good day, up 2.5%. it's hitting a ten-year high, on the last day of trade before it's going to break up. this afternoon after the close, it's going to spin off the north american grocery business. we're going to see two separate trading companies there. for right now, kft in its last stages seeing a nice pop today. bill? >> thank you very much, jackie deangelis. moo r maria, we have them coming out of the woodwork. another viewer sending us a photograph of mark zuckerberg wearing a suit. this time he's shaking the president's hand. okay. he's worn a suit three times in his life. if you have more photos of mark zmark mark zuckerberg in a suit, send them to maria. >>> it was a two market day if you will, had a rally on the open, the euro against the dollar. the euro coming off a
and get ready for school. with core curriculum in math and science and literacy, so the fact that we're in this debate, this is not about the budget. it has to be about politics. >> newsroom international begins right after this break. diarrhea, gas, bloating? yeah. one phillips' colon health probiotic cap each day helps defend against these digestive issues with three strains of good bacteria. approved! [ female announcer ] live the rular life. phillips'. [ female announcer ] live the rular life. i don't know what she that is .. but it's not round.. so why would headphones be round? they should be shaped like this.. 'earshaped'. you know .. so they fit in your ears. boring. boring. [ jack ] after lauren broke up with me, i went to the citi private pass page and decided to be...not boring. that's how i met marilyn... giada... really good. yes! [ jack ] ...and alicia. ♪ this girl is on fire [ male announcer ] use any citi card to get the benefits of private pass. more concerts, more events, more experiences. [ jack ] hey, who's boring now? [ male announcer ] get more access with the
who create jobs here in the united states. we need to recruit 100,000 math and science teachers, train 2 million workers at community college, bring down the cost of college tuition. [ cheers and applause ] we need to cut our oil imports in half, create thousands more jobs in clean energy. we need to use the savings from ending the wars in iraq and afghanistan to help pay down our deficit and put people back to work doing some nation building right here at home. that's the agenda we need. that's how you strengthen the middle class. that's how you keep moving forward. that is the choice in this election and that is why i'm running for a second term. that's what we need. [ cheers and applause ] now, my opponent has been trying to do a two-step and reposition and got an extreme makeover, but the bottom line is his underlying philosophy is the top down economics that we've seen before. he think that is if we just spend another $5 trillion on tax cuts, that, yes, skew towards the wealthiest, if we get rid of more regulations on wall street, then our problems will be involved. jobs and prosp
, and he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> thanks for staying with us, i'm bill o'reilly. in the what the heck just happened segment tonight? the whole country waiting to hear what greg gutfeld and bernard mcguirk thought of the presidential debate this week. we wanted to do something a little bit different. we asked the guys to select the strongest points that candidates made. gutfeld was assigned governor romney and mcguirk president obama. >> i should have watched the debate. rerun of dawson's creek so i missed the next thing. obama let mitt win so people could stop talking about that 2007 speech it was genius. joke. how could this be a surprise? you have a successful businessman who wipes the floor with a grad student. you have guy who knows jobs and a guy who knows jay-z. a guy who had a career. a guy who had a canine. there is no comparison and the most important thing is, this is what nobody is talking about. mitt had to win big. he couldn't just win. if he had just won, the press wo
to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> welcome back. i'm sharon epperson at the nymex. gold closing right now right where we started the week. gold prices closing just around $1,780 an ounce. we're down $14, $15 on the session. of course the fact that we got a better than expected jobs number means that we probably won't see quicker stimulus, though there may not be much change to what the federal reserve has already laid out in terms what have they're doing with monetary easing. gold prices this week have come close to the $1,800 level but have been unable to close above that mark. last week when china's back in session and we have geopolitics on the horizon, it could be a different picture. keep your eye on south africa in terms in palladium and platinum. back to you. >>> check out these gas prices. they're averaging about $3.80 a gallon pretty much across the country. but imagine this -- what if the u.s. started running low on gasoline? in parts of car crazy, california, my old home, that's become a reality and prices are indeed soarin
in science or medicine and will now be relegated to quackery. >>> and everybody's talking about arnold schwarzenegger's new book and how he had an affair with more than just the housekeeper. he chieted with actress bridget nielsen while living with maria shriver. >> you don't feel bad about it, you just write it. >> actually, i did feel bad about it. but all my various things were just mistakes. you know, my failure, my screwups. >> was that the only affair? >> no. i had others. but, you know, that's something that's obviously between marie and me. >> and we will hear from him in our next half hour. speaking of arnold, if you read only one thing this morning, i highly recommend janet maslin's review of his book. an autobiography of someone as mast master conniver. one thing you can depend on is that these will come together. delicious and wholesome. some combinations were just meant to be. tomato soup from campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. begins with back pain and a choice. take advil, and maybe have to take up to four in a day. or take aleve, which can relieve pain all day w
't mind sharing a little political science secret with you. although the debates routinely draw large viewing audiences, evidence shows that voters do learn a little bit of information from them, but political scientists also tend to agree that debates don't actually make a difference in the outcome. sorry. it's at least statistically true. most often, you can accurately predict where a race will end up after the debates by knowing where things stood before the debates. but don't tell the candidates. because with the first presidential debate coming up wednesday, governor romney and president obama will be gearing up for a fight. that's a good thing. we still need the debates. it's a so krat i can sem nor of sorts for the country having the candidates stand behind their podiums forced to answer for nair proposals. we get to see how the ideas stand up under questioning before you decide. at least for some of us, before we vote. here with me today is msnbc c contributor for the blog. latino.com's victoria did he francesco soto. she's a fellow at the university of texas. jam al simpsons
creation that is better than most states. we have in our science and technology sector, very strong sector growing, life science, biotech, i.t., professional services, health care with johns hopkins and others. >> governor? >> yes, sir. >> we had already, when the president proposed the american jobs act, we had already been over letting the bush tax cuts expire just for the rich, and keeping them for people less than 250. we had already had that argument three or four times and it was clear from the composition of congress at the time that the president put forth the american jobs act that there was no way that was going to happen. so letting it, where that was going to be a provision in the american jobs act was pure political posturing and in no way, he knew there was no way that that was going to pass. i just take issue with you saying that this was all republicans saying that they weren't going to, they were going to make sure the jobless rate was much higher. he knew full well that he could back them into the obstructionist corner by saying that we're definitely going to do that, mak
. there is some corals that live for many thousands of yeernz we found through some of the science we do we can drill holes down to the center of the corals and look at annual growth rings and we can look at when, in fact, when the first agriculture in australia happened, we saw a change in the type of chemistry that the annual growth rings and coral were depositing. so we have seen a chronology of increased siltation, of increased fertilization, of
of the i had i can't logs. they're champions of the sweet science of political and economic thought of their respective parties. the golden boy of the economic doctrine. ryan the self-described -- the architect of the conservative platform, upon which the gop now stands. the plan to slash the deficit by gutting social programs and his party is saying he built that. in the other corner, a granddaddy of the base. 29 years old, joe biden became one of the youngest people ever elected to the u.s. senate. he's been steep in the political gospel of the democratic party for 40 years. he's played key roles in u.s. foreign policy as a member and chairman of the foreign committee. middle east, southwest asia, the united states has been there in the last four decades. joe biden has too. of course, congressman paul ryan who chairs the house budget committee also likes to tout his foreign policy chops. >> i have more foreign policy experience coming into this job than president obama did coming into his. >> can you explain how do you have more foreign policy experience than senator obama did. he
math and science teach towers improve our education. doubling our exports. all of those things that will help create jobs as we move forward and strengthen our economy. i must say charlie i was struck by kevin's answer about the fact that once again the romney campaign says they really don't have time to discuss the specifics of their tax plan. and, you know, this is a $5 trillion tax cut for the wealthy. >> we haven't heard the specifics of what the president is prepared to do in terms of spending cuts as well. >> i don't think that's true. i think if you look at the budget plan that the president has outlined, he has a $4 trillion spending cut plan that deals to make sure our tax code is fair and that those that are on the upper end of that tax code are a paying more. mitt romney's $5 trillion tax plan isn't hard to explain because of the time it's hard to explain because of the math. the math doesn't add up. $5 trillion isn't paid for and what it requires is economic studies have shown this is that mitt romney has to raise taxes on middle class people to provide people like
isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> we've heard it all morning long it and still makes us jump. a huge 747 crashing in the dessert, by remote control, all part of the discover channel's new "curiosity" series where a controlled experiment was captured by 40 cameras and sensors to give researchers what happens during a crash atlantaing. >> it airs on discovery channel this sunday night at 9 p.m. two top experts are here with us now, accident investigator dr. tom barth and dr. cindy bir. >> thank you for being with us this morning. we're very excited about this. >> i asked you, dr. bir, earlier, have you ever attempted to do this before and you said you have. this took over four years to plan. why did you want to crash a plane? >> we were -- i was approached by a production company to do this about four years ago. i think tom and i were approached about the same sometime. and was just such an interesting project. i didn't attempt it before, but it was attempted back in '84. and they had lessons learned. we have new technology. so, it was a wonderful opp
on this one. you think of people like steve balmer, jim cramer. >> but there is science behind this. >> more testosterone. >> it's the testosterone that kills the hair. you're more aggressive. you're an aggressor. >> how do you keep your hair? >> if zucker was still -- i would be nicer, he has a full head of hair so i'm not afraid right now. if some guy who is unfortunately is bald happens to end up in a powerful position, it's not because of being bald, it's in spite of being bald. toupees look like crap. you can't buy a decent toupee. >> rarely bald anymore. maybe works in business, not in politics, i don't know. kong. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 after that, it's on to germany. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 then tonight, i'm trading 9500 miles away in japan. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 with the new global account from schwab, tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 i hunt down opportunities around the world tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 as if i'm right there. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and i'm in total control because i can trade tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 directly online in 12 markets in their local currencies. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 i use their global
and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. septic disasters are disgusting and costly, but avoidable. the rid-x septic subscriber program helps prevent backups by sending you monthly doses right to your door so you will never forget to maintain your system. sign up at rid-x.com. [ ♪ theme ♪ ] >> announcer: broadcasting across the nation on your radio >> broadcasting across the nation on your radio and on current tv. this is the bill press show. >> it is tweeted paul ryan is so frustrated with mitt romney, he hopes liam neeson comes to rescue the campaign. i'm john fugelsang sitting in for bill. thank you so much for spending your morning with us. we are taking your calls at 866-55-press. we're talking all about the debate this week and all about the campaign. we are talking about the gift of comedy that is jerry brown's admirable of banning reparative gay behavior. >> i think you cover issues that a lot of men care about too. >> i hope men care about those issues. >> a lot of men care about
to recruit 100,000 new math and science teachers to train to make sure our young people have -- to make sure our young people have the skills that they need. we got to train 2 million workers at community colleges to bring down college tuition cost s. we got to cut our oil imports in half and create thousands of new jobs and energy. we got to use the savings from ending the war in iraq and afghanistan, to pay down our deficit. put some people to work, doing some nation building right here at home. that's the agenda we need. that's how you strengthen the middle class. that's how you keep moving forward. that's the choice in this election. that's why i'm asking for your vote. now, my opponent, he's doing a lot of -- a little tap dance at the debate the other night. trying to wiggle out of stuff he's been saying for years. doing like a -- like "dancing with the stars." or maybe it was "extreme makeover." debate edition. but no matter what he says, my opponent, he's a big believer of the top downeconomics. he thinks if we spend another $5 trillion on tax cuts that favor the althiest, we get rid
is helpful to you in any way? >> there's a lot of emerging science. there's a percentage of americans that are trying gluten free to help them feel better, to help them achieve personal goals and you know, we hope that gluten free helps them get to where they want to go. >> it is a fad. there's no doubt the market research data shows that it's a fad. it's a $4.9 billion business. >> elizabeth sloan is one of the corrupt's leading experts on trends in the food industry. >> people believe that if they go do a gluten free diet, it's going to make them lose weight. there is no scientific evidence to show that's the case. >> everybody's doing it, everybody's talking about it, but it doesn't mean that it's good for everybody. >> dr. mark high man is the founder of the ultra medical center. >> is gluten healthy? >> gluten is not either healthy or unhealthy. it depends on whether your body is rejecting it. >> there's this sort of general feeling among people who don't know too much about it that giving up gluten is probably a good idea because it's going to make me healthier, true. >> if a fo
? joining us now a reporter from the christian science monitor. good morning. >> good morning. >> are big bird and pbs really in any danger here? >> i don't think big bird's had things this good in awhile. he's huge on twitter now. his twitter presence increased like 800,000%. and the thing about big bird and "sesame street," they have so much outside funding that it's not like "sesame street" is going to disappear. pbs, though, that subsidy, it's a sizeable chunk of their budget. it would be a big blow. >> about how much? do you have a perspective on how much that is? how much the government chips in? >> it fluctuates year to year. it's about 10 to 15%. in 2011 about 12% of pbs's budget funneled through the corporation of public broadcasting. came from the government subsidy. >> pbs has released a statement accusing governor romney of making pbs a political target and of not understanding the value of the american people place in public broadcasting. how do americans generally view public broadcasting? and its funding? >> i mean, people are generally very favorable of it. pbs did a study
, that going without gluten is helpful to you in any way? >> there's a lot of emerging science. there's a percentage of americans that are trying gluten-free to help them feel better, to help them achieve personal goals, and we hope that gluten-free helps them get to where they want to go. >> it is a fad. there's no doubt the research data shows that it's a fad. it's a $4.9 billion business. >> elizabeth sloan. >> people believe it's going to make them lose weight and there's no scientific evidence to show that's the case. >> everybody's talking about it, but it doesn't mean that it's good for everybody. >> reporter: dr. mark hyman is the founder of the ultra wellness center. >> reporter: is gluten healthy? >> it's not either healthy or unhealthy. it depends on whether your body is rejecting it. >> reporter: there's this general feeling of people that getting off gluten is a better idea because it's going to make me healthier. true? >> if a food has a health claim on it, it's probably unhealthy. >> well said. >>> still to come, the woman who survived a horrific accident that actually
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 60 (some duplicates have been removed)